WELLynx at Lesley University

Lesley's heath and wellness initiative supporting staff, faculty, and students.
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it’s spring!! build a container garden for your deck, porch, stoop, sidewalk…

jtotheizzoe:

Think you’re a smart shopper? What if I told you that your buyer’s brain could be tricked by something as simple as color?

We’ve evolved natural reactions to some colors (like red for blood, or anger, or sexual fertility), and we’ve been culturally adapted to many others, so it’s no surprise that color can subtly influence our behavior.

Don’t buy it? Let BrainCraft explain!

scinerds:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

How awesome is this! :-D!!

food for thought - prejudices towards Europe (humorously) illustrated 

fastcompany:

This Atlas Maps Prejudice, Not Places

Americans think the French have smelly armpits. Swedes think Germans make bad cars. Here are the narrow-minded and hilarious ways that people around the world envision the map of Europe.

More> Co.Exist

15 Plants and Herbs for Respiratory Health
Just a brief sampling (view the article for full list and details):
licorice root - loosens phlegm, soothes (and more!)
thyme - alleviates congestion (and more!)
oregano - reduces histamines (and more!)

15 Plants and Herbs for Respiratory Health

Just a brief sampling (view the article for full list and details):

  • licorice root - loosens phlegm, soothes (and more!)
  • thyme - alleviates congestion (and more!)
  • oregano - reduces histamines (and more!)

a quick little list of personal hygiene uses for baking soda:

  • brush your teeth with it
  • wash your face with it
  • make deodorant with it
  • treat pimples with it
  • wash your hair with it
  • settle your stomach with it
  • soak your skin in it

The blog comes highly recommended from a former WELLynx committee member. 

Lacy Davis is a vegan fitness enthusiast. She refuses to let society dictate her sense of fulfillment and self worth.

checkit!

Lesley University is conducting a health and wellness survey to enhance the wellness program offerings sponsored by Human Resources and WELLynx, the University’s wellness programming committee.  This survey will provide WELLynx the information needed to develop relevant wellness programming. 

Please take a few moments to complete this survey.  All responses are anonymous and confidential.  Once the information is tabulated, we will provide an update to the Lesley community.

Please complete the survey by close of business on April 18, 2014. 


Link to survey: https://lesley.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3WQVO4ASIlY89db

teded:

When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine — an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How sugar affects the brain - Nicole Avena

Animation by STK Films